Jun. 4th, 2017

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torontolesbian:

hedgehogwithatank:

cartnsncreal:

this

Imagine somebody bombing america for all the geneva conventions voilations in guantanamo

imagine america being treated the way it treats every other country in the world

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hustleinatrap:

This is phenomenal! These young and beautiful women from Mexico are proud of their African roots. The dance is a peculiar expression of their love and respect for the culture they relate to. These women identified themselves as Black and even made the government include them as Afro-Mexicans in the national census in 2015!

This is what Black Pride means. Very inspiring!

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dailylizzieolsen:

Official Trailer for “Wind River”(2017) Starring Elizabeth Olsen and Jeremy Renner

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superheroesincolor:

Boxers & Saints (2013)   //  First Second Books.

China,1898. Bands of foreign missionaries and soldiers roam the countryside, bullying and robbing Chinese peasants.

Little Bao has had enough. Harnessing the powers of ancient Chinese gods, he recruits an army of Boxers - commoners trained in kung fu who fight to free China from “foreign devils.”

Against all odds, this grass-roots rebellion is violently successful. But nothing is simple. Little Bao is fighting for the glory of China, but at what cost? So many are dying, including thousands of “secondary devils” - Chinese citizens who have converted to Christianity.

Boxers & Saints is an innovative new graphic novel in two volumes - the parallel stories of two young people caught up on opposite sides of a violent rift. American Born Chinese author Gene Luen Yang brings his clear-eyed storytelling and trademark magical realism to the complexities of the Boxer Rebellion and lays bare the foundations of extremism, rebellion, and faith.

By Gene Luen Yang, color: Lark Pien 

Get it now here  

[ Follow SuperheroesInColor on facebook / instagram / twitter / tumblr ]

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lifeisverybeautiful:

ricefield (via 棚田の写真 :PHOTOHITO)

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thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

proxima-versailles:

thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

scotsdragon:

sisterofsilence:

neshtasplace:

kalinara:

naamahdarling:

gardnerhill:

madlori:

This scene was actually when I went from feeling more or less neutral on Joan to actively disliking her.

Because wow, that was patronizing.

I loved that scene in Elementary.

1) Firstly, because it immediately deconstructs the “hero throws and breaks something in frustration” cliche (Sherlock throwing a glass slide in HoB, anyone?) it might even be seen as a parody of that cliche.

2) Secondly, because the dynamic is different between a man and a woman than it would be between two women or two men, the visual of a man smashing something in a temper in front of a woman can be taken as threatening or borderline abusive. Joan Watson immediately shows that she is not intimidated by Holmes’ behavior.

3) Lastly? One of the running themes of Elementary is the deconstruction of Sherlock Holmes as the solitary, antisocial genius, and his becoming a member of a community. Holmes’ gifts are given their due respect, but no one in Elementary plays the game of Because Sherlock Holmes is a Bloody Genius He Can Do Whatever He Wants So There. When Sherlock goes after Moriarty (“M”), Captain Gregson suspends him. When Sherlock doesn’t want to talk about his addiction, Alfredo says “You’ve got to get over yourself.” And when Sherlock behaves like a spoiled child, Joan tells him “Use your words.”

You see Joan patronizing Sherlock. I see a member of Sherlock’s community teaching him how to behave like an adult member of that community.

More of this sort of thing please.

I sometimes think as a fandom we lose a certain amount of perspective when looking at the characters we love.  We focus on the character’s sympathetic issues like addiction, or trauma, or mental illness, and that’s understandable.  But then we react very badly when other characters (or other fans) call our favorite out on bad behavior.  It isn’t patronizing or ableist to expect someone to try to behave like a decent person or to call them out when they’re not doing that.

Also I mean, a female character standing up to a male character (especially an “eccentric one) is often seen a major no-no because she must always be accommodating to him and I like that Joan just…does not stand for that shit.

When people call a woman ‘patronising’ for not putting up with a man’s bullshit, I kinda side-eye them. The fandoms focus on why Joan is horrible is preeeetttyyy iffy, and not at all surprising.

I was honestly surprised to see ‘this is when I started disliking Joan’ when scrolling past the gifs because that was a genuinely good moment. Seriously, what the fuck?

People who hate Joan Watson are not to be trusted O.O

Yeah, those people are very suspicious

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americasgreatoutdoors:

Among one of the most inspiring vistas in the world, Tunnel View provides a perfect sunrise view of Yosemite National Park in California. From here you can see El Capitan and Bridalveil Fall rising from Yosemite Valley, with Half Dome in the background. This view gets its name from its location at the east end of the Wawona Tunnel. If you haven’t seen it for yourselves, put it on your bucketlist now. Photo by David Laurence Sharp (http://ift.tt/18oFfjl).

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