kyburg: (Default)
I had significantly less internet time that I had anticipated. Yes, the hotel had it (completely unsecured, no less), and Mom's house has service - but there just wasn't time enough to sit unencumbered and write anything. And as wide-open as that part of Kentucky is (seriously, everything is horses, cows or grass as far as you can see), it was largely people on top of people. In every way, this was an intensely social experience - and while that has its joys, it was also as much work as I had anticipated.

I don't know what people have against the word 'work' - it's appropriate to the effort expended and to its type. You are attempting to negotiate socially through other's established expectations without tripping. You are making sure your (and your family's) needs are met without pushing or shoving your way to the front of every line. Anticipating what your travel plans are going to demand to ensure you don't leave anything last minute (because, let's face it, that stuff is entirely on you and making everyone scramble for your lack of planning is just plain dickish behavior).

Reducing your impact as much as possible. Being a good guest.

There's very little room for autopilot - it's very much a command performance, whether it is intended to be or not.

So. It was everything I had expected, and then some.

Aside from actual family interactions?

Let me tick off the list.

I had people tell me how to parent my kid in the airport terminals.

I had so many people 'compliment' my kid by telling me they'd love to take him home with them that by day three, I had to have the conversation in the car about how WE were his parents and NOBODY else was going to take him home with them. (And to Xander's credit, he was very adamant about going home only with HIS Mommy and HIS Daddy.) No, we both never left our kid home with anyone else, family or not. We could turn him loose to play with the other kids, but only when one of us was within reach. He did not need to keep checking on where we were - at least, I didn't see it. That's a mark of the comfort he had with the rest of the family.

He's so cute. Yes, we know. I am also certain when he's in his teens, I am going to hear just how sick and tired he got of hearing that. On the way home, we literally had two other Chinese kids glued to us in the terminal at Louisville (they were travelling with grandparents) talking about Pokemon - and is he adopted or something? - and I can't help thinking they were very happy to see another Asian face near their own age.

Let's hear it for parenting classes. All this and more was expected and I wasn't overprepared in the least.

Jim has a Korean aunt, hapa cousins - which didn't hurt - but. Even Xander confronted Auntie about why she was different. Yup, he noticed.

I don't know if folks saw the stress, or even believed me when I spoke about it - but thankfully, it was never disabling. It was present, trust me. By day 8 or 9, the lovies came out and were carried around during the day - under normal conditions, they only get attention at night or when he's not feeling well. And carrying as much of his possessions as he can put in his arms is a clear sign of displacement stress - we were about 3/4's of the way there. I would hear about 'are my kitties waiting for me?' at night. Of course they were, dear. Of course.

We loved the hotel for the first four nights while Mom's house had other family residing there for the family reunion - maybe there were cheaper accomodations, but we've done those (and the last one had me on the floor with only three hours sleep the last time) and planning ahead? Lovely experience all on its own, and wouldn't have missed it. Also, being on the Berea campus itself (the hotel is a work-study provider for the college) provided more racial diversity than anywhere else during our visit - an unexpected benefit. There was also a fudge store next door, with a toy store next to that. Almost as if they were expecting us. ^^

Jim's Father's Day was brunch at the hotel, just the three of us.

How much more detail to go into, hmmm. There always seemed to be a genuine effort to keep everything simple and superficial - which might be appropriate to a large group of folks who might only breathe room air together once or twice a year - and us, even more rarely.

I kept getting asked 'aren't you HOT?' on Saturday. Well, I am wearing long pants, t-shirt and sneakers - on a day where the heat index was over 114. That's 94 + 95% humidity, I think - but I didn't stand outside in the sun to broil, ate modestly and drank fluids. I'm also an old desert rat from Hemet, and yeah - it was hot. So? Kid didn't have a single problem with it, but Dad about melted into the pavement.

The amount of air-conditioning was amazing. Yes, it was hot outside, but everywhere we went, we were greeted by crisp, COLD air upon hitting the doors of any building. Easily a 20+ delta. And the humidity had to be more than 50% less indoors than out. Kid developed a nosebleed the last night there, and that's my only possible explanation.

Somethings that made me shake my head:

I got carded. No, seriously. I got carded at a Buffalo Wild Wings at dinner one night - and the only explanation I have is I had a preschool aged child, and only one of them. "You must feel really young!" is what I was offered when I happily protested my nearly 50 years of age. Um. Do that many women have their first kids that far below the legal drinking age? I certainly saw enough young women with children - and providing for small children was clearly more interesting there than here. Here, you'd be told to cross your legs.

News reports on the local station were interesting in that 'oh, that's considered important?' sort of way - a small child had drowned for the second time in a backyard pool, almost a year to the day after the first incident. The photo provided with the broadcast was a cute little girl with floaties, noodles, goggles, the works. Drowned. Twice. Same pool, same adult supervising - and the primary concern expressed by the family? They didn't like being 'blamed' for it. Does blame have a literal weight and value? And as for the reporting? Repetition is newsworthy - that's the primary reason they're reporting the story at all. (I hope everything turned out okay - never heard anything further.)

Conversation with an out-of-work cousin:

Us: So, what kind of work would you like to go into?
Him: I want to get into the military.
Us: Really? What do you want to do?
Him: Sniper school. I want to shoot people.
Me: You realize that that's not considered a viable life skill, right?

(Really. You want to defend the borders, join the Coast Guard. Only branch of the military directly under the Department of Homeland Defense. PSA for the day.)

You know what's good for jet lag? Pokemon is good for jet lag. There were many early (and late) hours when at least two of the three of us were playing on our DS machines. I finally finished Pearl, and started Silver on the way home.

The sheer amount of unaware racism was amazing. At least one relative or two was certain - dead certain - there was no hope for anyone not black in this country today. Why, because we have a black man as President? It just didn't register. Said a lot more about expectations about what was anticipated by race. And that something really had been done to POC and reciprocation was coming...soon. Because.

My kid was adorable. He's also amazingly well-behaved, mischievous, scary smart and full of beans. I would have appreciated hearing anything else besides adorable - it verged on labeling him like a commodity. I know some parents have been asked how much their children cost - is this akin to that? I'd need more experience with parents of small, adorable children. Two cents requested, guys.

I'm still able to talk car repair with reasonable comfort - but I hadn't done it in decades. Hey, this is how I got through college - POS car, lots of time keeping it on the road? Boy, that takes me back, let me tell you!

We're going to have to add something to Jim's health screenings from now on - there's Type II in the last three generations, including his.

We also did get down to Tennessee to visit his grandparents' graves and pay our respects - that was also something of an experience. The whole place was covered in silk flower arrangements. I mean. ALL. Trying to explain that this is something completely out of my experience (yes, we leave things at the gravesite, but not something so completely artificial), it was another touchstone moment.

Make it look good.

Make it consistent.

Make it predictable.

There were more BUGS than kid had ever seen, and there were nets to catch them with. Fireflies were present and caught - video taken of same - and there kid was still catching butterflies five minutes before we left. No, we did not bring the nets back with us.

Big hamburger cows, with baby beef in the fields. Horses. Dogs. Just a few cats, which is probably why I kept hearing about missing ours at home.

Great big thunderstorms that dropped buckets of water. Big gusty winds. Lightning.

And everything green, green, green. Here, that's a season, and it's only a few months long before it dries out and browns in the summer, and then burns in the fall and winter.

I could only imagine how it must have been for Jim - but he didn't cope with the weather well, matter of fact, he was affected the most of the three of us and didn't feel well a lot of the time.

I'm glad to be home.

And we were so focused on this trip we completely vaped that Anime Expo is this week. D'OH.

Rushing to catch up, as we speak.
kyburg: (Default)
I had significantly less internet time that I had anticipated. Yes, the hotel had it (completely unsecured, no less), and Mom's house has service - but there just wasn't time enough to sit unencumbered and write anything. And as wide-open as that part of Kentucky is (seriously, everything is horses, cows or grass as far as you can see), it was largely people on top of people. In every way, this was an intensely social experience - and while that has its joys, it was also as much work as I had anticipated.

I don't know what people have against the word 'work' - it's appropriate to the effort expended and to its type. You are attempting to negotiate socially through other's established expectations without tripping. You are making sure your (and your family's) needs are met without pushing or shoving your way to the front of every line. Anticipating what your travel plans are going to demand to ensure you don't leave anything last minute (because, let's face it, that stuff is entirely on you and making everyone scramble for your lack of planning is just plain dickish behavior).

Reducing your impact as much as possible. Being a good guest.

There's very little room for autopilot - it's very much a command performance, whether it is intended to be or not.

So. It was everything I had expected, and then some.

Aside from actual family interactions?

Let me tick off the list.

I had people tell me how to parent my kid in the airport terminals.

I had so many people 'compliment' my kid by telling me they'd love to take him home with them that by day three, I had to have the conversation in the car about how WE were his parents and NOBODY else was going to take him home with them. (And to Xander's credit, he was very adamant about going home only with HIS Mommy and HIS Daddy.) No, we both never left our kid home with anyone else, family or not. We could turn him loose to play with the other kids, but only when one of us was within reach. He did not need to keep checking on where we were - at least, I didn't see it. That's a mark of the comfort he had with the rest of the family.

He's so cute. Yes, we know. I am also certain when he's in his teens, I am going to hear just how sick and tired he got of hearing that. On the way home, we literally had two other Chinese kids glued to us in the terminal at Louisville (they were travelling with grandparents) talking about Pokemon - and is he adopted or something? - and I can't help thinking they were very happy to see another Asian face near their own age.

Let's hear it for parenting classes. All this and more was expected and I wasn't overprepared in the least.

Jim has a Korean aunt, hapa cousins - which didn't hurt - but. Even Xander confronted Auntie about why she was different. Yup, he noticed.

I don't know if folks saw the stress, or even believed me when I spoke about it - but thankfully, it was never disabling. It was present, trust me. By day 8 or 9, the lovies came out and were carried around during the day - under normal conditions, they only get attention at night or when he's not feeling well. And carrying as much of his possessions as he can put in his arms is a clear sign of displacement stress - we were about 3/4's of the way there. I would hear about 'are my kitties waiting for me?' at night. Of course they were, dear. Of course.

We loved the hotel for the first four nights while Mom's house had other family residing there for the family reunion - maybe there were cheaper accomodations, but we've done those (and the last one had me on the floor with only three hours sleep the last time) and planning ahead? Lovely experience all on its own, and wouldn't have missed it. Also, being on the Berea campus itself (the hotel is a work-study provider for the college) provided more racial diversity than anywhere else during our visit - an unexpected benefit. There was also a fudge store next door, with a toy store next to that. Almost as if they were expecting us. ^^

Jim's Father's Day was brunch at the hotel, just the three of us.

How much more detail to go into, hmmm. There always seemed to be a genuine effort to keep everything simple and superficial - which might be appropriate to a large group of folks who might only breathe room air together once or twice a year - and us, even more rarely.

I kept getting asked 'aren't you HOT?' on Saturday. Well, I am wearing long pants, t-shirt and sneakers - on a day where the heat index was over 114. That's 94 + 95% humidity, I think - but I didn't stand outside in the sun to broil, ate modestly and drank fluids. I'm also an old desert rat from Hemet, and yeah - it was hot. So? Kid didn't have a single problem with it, but Dad about melted into the pavement.

The amount of air-conditioning was amazing. Yes, it was hot outside, but everywhere we went, we were greeted by crisp, COLD air upon hitting the doors of any building. Easily a 20+ delta. And the humidity had to be more than 50% less indoors than out. Kid developed a nosebleed the last night there, and that's my only possible explanation.

Somethings that made me shake my head:

I got carded. No, seriously. I got carded at a Buffalo Wild Wings at dinner one night - and the only explanation I have is I had a preschool aged child, and only one of them. "You must feel really young!" is what I was offered when I happily protested my nearly 50 years of age. Um. Do that many women have their first kids that far below the legal drinking age? I certainly saw enough young women with children - and providing for small children was clearly more interesting there than here. Here, you'd be told to cross your legs.

News reports on the local station were interesting in that 'oh, that's considered important?' sort of way - a small child had drowned for the second time in a backyard pool, almost a year to the day after the first incident. The photo provided with the broadcast was a cute little girl with floaties, noodles, goggles, the works. Drowned. Twice. Same pool, same adult supervising - and the primary concern expressed by the family? They didn't like being 'blamed' for it. Does blame have a literal weight and value? And as for the reporting? Repetition is newsworthy - that's the primary reason they're reporting the story at all. (I hope everything turned out okay - never heard anything further.)

Conversation with an out-of-work cousin:

Us: So, what kind of work would you like to go into?
Him: I want to get into the military.
Us: Really? What do you want to do?
Him: Sniper school. I want to shoot people.
Me: You realize that that's not considered a viable life skill, right?

(Really. You want to defend the borders, join the Coast Guard. Only branch of the military directly under the Department of Homeland Defense. PSA for the day.)

You know what's good for jet lag? Pokemon is good for jet lag. There were many early (and late) hours when at least two of the three of us were playing on our DS machines. I finally finished Pearl, and started Silver on the way home.

The sheer amount of unaware racism was amazing. At least one relative or two was certain - dead certain - there was no hope for anyone not black in this country today. Why, because we have a black man as President? It just didn't register. Said a lot more about expectations about what was anticipated by race. And that something really had been done to POC and reciprocation was coming...soon. Because.

My kid was adorable. He's also amazingly well-behaved, mischievous, scary smart and full of beans. I would have appreciated hearing anything else besides adorable - it verged on labeling him like a commodity. I know some parents have been asked how much their children cost - is this akin to that? I'd need more experience with parents of small, adorable children. Two cents requested, guys.

I'm still able to talk car repair with reasonable comfort - but I hadn't done it in decades. Hey, this is how I got through college - POS car, lots of time keeping it on the road? Boy, that takes me back, let me tell you!

We're going to have to add something to Jim's health screenings from now on - there's Type II in the last three generations, including his.

We also did get down to Tennessee to visit his grandparents' graves and pay our respects - that was also something of an experience. The whole place was covered in silk flower arrangements. I mean. ALL. Trying to explain that this is something completely out of my experience (yes, we leave things at the gravesite, but not something so completely artificial), it was another touchstone moment.

Make it look good.

Make it consistent.

Make it predictable.

There were more BUGS than kid had ever seen, and there were nets to catch them with. Fireflies were present and caught - video taken of same - and there kid was still catching butterflies five minutes before we left. No, we did not bring the nets back with us.

Big hamburger cows, with baby beef in the fields. Horses. Dogs. Just a few cats, which is probably why I kept hearing about missing ours at home.

Great big thunderstorms that dropped buckets of water. Big gusty winds. Lightning.

And everything green, green, green. Here, that's a season, and it's only a few months long before it dries out and browns in the summer, and then burns in the fall and winter.

I could only imagine how it must have been for Jim - but he didn't cope with the weather well, matter of fact, he was affected the most of the three of us and didn't feel well a lot of the time.

I'm glad to be home.

And we were so focused on this trip we completely vaped that Anime Expo is this week. D'OH.

Rushing to catch up, as we speak.
kyburg: (Default)
I had significantly less internet time that I had anticipated. Yes, the hotel had it (completely unsecured, no less), and Mom's house has service - but there just wasn't time enough to sit unencumbered and write anything. And as wide-open as that part of Kentucky is (seriously, everything is horses, cows or grass as far as you can see), it was largely people on top of people. In every way, this was an intensely social experience - and while that has its joys, it was also as much work as I had anticipated.

I don't know what people have against the word 'work' - it's appropriate to the effort expended and to its type. You are attempting to negotiate socially through other's established expectations without tripping. You are making sure your (and your family's) needs are met without pushing or shoving your way to the front of every line. Anticipating what your travel plans are going to demand to ensure you don't leave anything last minute (because, let's face it, that stuff is entirely on you and making everyone scramble for your lack of planning is just plain dickish behavior).

Reducing your impact as much as possible. Being a good guest.

There's very little room for autopilot - it's very much a command performance, whether it is intended to be or not.

So. It was everything I had expected, and then some.

Aside from actual family interactions?

Let me tick off the list.

I had people tell me how to parent my kid in the airport terminals.

I had so many people 'compliment' my kid by telling me they'd love to take him home with them that by day three, I had to have the conversation in the car about how WE were his parents and NOBODY else was going to take him home with them. (And to Xander's credit, he was very adamant about going home only with HIS Mommy and HIS Daddy.) No, we both never left our kid home with anyone else, family or not. We could turn him loose to play with the other kids, but only when one of us was within reach. He did not need to keep checking on where we were - at least, I didn't see it. That's a mark of the comfort he had with the rest of the family.

He's so cute. Yes, we know. I am also certain when he's in his teens, I am going to hear just how sick and tired he got of hearing that. On the way home, we literally had two other Chinese kids glued to us in the terminal at Louisville (they were travelling with grandparents) talking about Pokemon - and is he adopted or something? - and I can't help thinking they were very happy to see another Asian face near their own age.

Let's hear it for parenting classes. All this and more was expected and I wasn't overprepared in the least.

Jim has a Korean aunt, hapa cousins - which didn't hurt - but. Even Xander confronted Auntie about why she was different. Yup, he noticed.

I don't know if folks saw the stress, or even believed me when I spoke about it - but thankfully, it was never disabling. It was present, trust me. By day 8 or 9, the lovies came out and were carried around during the day - under normal conditions, they only get attention at night or when he's not feeling well. And carrying as much of his possessions as he can put in his arms is a clear sign of displacement stress - we were about 3/4's of the way there. I would hear about 'are my kitties waiting for me?' at night. Of course they were, dear. Of course.

We loved the hotel for the first four nights while Mom's house had other family residing there for the family reunion - maybe there were cheaper accomodations, but we've done those (and the last one had me on the floor with only three hours sleep the last time) and planning ahead? Lovely experience all on its own, and wouldn't have missed it. Also, being on the Berea campus itself (the hotel is a work-study provider for the college) provided more racial diversity than anywhere else during our visit - an unexpected benefit. There was also a fudge store next door, with a toy store next to that. Almost as if they were expecting us. ^^

Jim's Father's Day was brunch at the hotel, just the three of us.

How much more detail to go into, hmmm. There always seemed to be a genuine effort to keep everything simple and superficial - which might be appropriate to a large group of folks who might only breathe room air together once or twice a year - and us, even more rarely.

I kept getting asked 'aren't you HOT?' on Saturday. Well, I am wearing long pants, t-shirt and sneakers - on a day where the heat index was over 114. That's 94 + 95% humidity, I think - but I didn't stand outside in the sun to broil, ate modestly and drank fluids. I'm also an old desert rat from Hemet, and yeah - it was hot. So? Kid didn't have a single problem with it, but Dad about melted into the pavement.

The amount of air-conditioning was amazing. Yes, it was hot outside, but everywhere we went, we were greeted by crisp, COLD air upon hitting the doors of any building. Easily a 20+ delta. And the humidity had to be more than 50% less indoors than out. Kid developed a nosebleed the last night there, and that's my only possible explanation.

Somethings that made me shake my head:

I got carded. No, seriously. I got carded at a Buffalo Wild Wings at dinner one night - and the only explanation I have is I had a preschool aged child, and only one of them. "You must feel really young!" is what I was offered when I happily protested my nearly 50 years of age. Um. Do that many women have their first kids that far below the legal drinking age? I certainly saw enough young women with children - and providing for small children was clearly more interesting there than here. Here, you'd be told to cross your legs.

News reports on the local station were interesting in that 'oh, that's considered important?' sort of way - a small child had drowned for the second time in a backyard pool, almost a year to the day after the first incident. The photo provided with the broadcast was a cute little girl with floaties, noodles, goggles, the works. Drowned. Twice. Same pool, same adult supervising - and the primary concern expressed by the family? They didn't like being 'blamed' for it. Does blame have a literal weight and value? And as for the reporting? Repetition is newsworthy - that's the primary reason they're reporting the story at all. (I hope everything turned out okay - never heard anything further.)

Conversation with an out-of-work cousin:

Us: So, what kind of work would you like to go into?
Him: I want to get into the military.
Us: Really? What do you want to do?
Him: Sniper school. I want to shoot people.
Me: You realize that that's not considered a viable life skill, right?

(Really. You want to defend the borders, join the Coast Guard. Only branch of the military directly under the Department of Homeland Defense. PSA for the day.)

You know what's good for jet lag? Pokemon is good for jet lag. There were many early (and late) hours when at least two of the three of us were playing on our DS machines. I finally finished Pearl, and started Silver on the way home.

The sheer amount of unaware racism was amazing. At least one relative or two was certain - dead certain - there was no hope for anyone not black in this country today. Why, because we have a black man as President? It just didn't register. Said a lot more about expectations about what was anticipated by race. And that something really had been done to POC and reciprocation was coming...soon. Because.

My kid was adorable. He's also amazingly well-behaved, mischievous, scary smart and full of beans. I would have appreciated hearing anything else besides adorable - it verged on labeling him like a commodity. I know some parents have been asked how much their children cost - is this akin to that? I'd need more experience with parents of small, adorable children. Two cents requested, guys.

I'm still able to talk car repair with reasonable comfort - but I hadn't done it in decades. Hey, this is how I got through college - POS car, lots of time keeping it on the road? Boy, that takes me back, let me tell you!

We're going to have to add something to Jim's health screenings from now on - there's Type II in the last three generations, including his.

We also did get down to Tennessee to visit his grandparents' graves and pay our respects - that was also something of an experience. The whole place was covered in silk flower arrangements. I mean. ALL. Trying to explain that this is something completely out of my experience (yes, we leave things at the gravesite, but not something so completely artificial), it was another touchstone moment.

Make it look good.

Make it consistent.

Make it predictable.

There were more BUGS than kid had ever seen, and there were nets to catch them with. Fireflies were present and caught - video taken of same - and there kid was still catching butterflies five minutes before we left. No, we did not bring the nets back with us.

Big hamburger cows, with baby beef in the fields. Horses. Dogs. Just a few cats, which is probably why I kept hearing about missing ours at home.

Great big thunderstorms that dropped buckets of water. Big gusty winds. Lightning.

And everything green, green, green. Here, that's a season, and it's only a few months long before it dries out and browns in the summer, and then burns in the fall and winter.

I could only imagine how it must have been for Jim - but he didn't cope with the weather well, matter of fact, he was affected the most of the three of us and didn't feel well a lot of the time.

I'm glad to be home.

And we were so focused on this trip we completely vaped that Anime Expo is this week. D'OH.

Rushing to catch up, as we speak.

...

Jun. 15th, 2010 02:19 pm
kyburg: (GET STUFFED)
If I make it to Friday without walking into traffic?

AWESOME.

...

Jun. 15th, 2010 02:19 pm
kyburg: (GET STUFFED)
If I make it to Friday without walking into traffic?

AWESOME.

...

Jun. 15th, 2010 02:19 pm
kyburg: (GET STUFFED)
If I make it to Friday without walking into traffic?

AWESOME.
kyburg: (Default)
I've got three days before I get on a plane. And then I'm away from home for over a week.

Tonight, I pack the box of ship-aheads - and pull out the beast from storage and begin putting it all together to be self-contained and out of suitcases. Oh, and pack an extra empty one because I know what I find when I go back there. There's a candle outlet store that is the BEST I've ever been inside, and the antique shopping doesn't get much better. Seriously, I've brought home Nippon porcelain every time, and that stuff is HARD to find anywhere else. Back there, it's just Gran's pretty teapot or somesuch. To me, it's something old, but very specific to a time and place - and just look at those landscapes. Um, nerd. Am I a collector? No, I'm a hoarder. 'Nuff said.

In other news, the WTF list continues to grow (no, you don't know all of it) and I've had to pull out the short list of who to call who won't be damaged when I start talking about some of it. It's not just who can handle the load - it's who can find the fracking humor in the whack of the last three weeks. Because first you get the list, and then you get me shaking my head and bibbling while I try to get my head around it.

Kid had an AWESOME weekend. Saturday was Torrance's City Maintenance Yard Open House. Yes, the place with all the landscaping equipment and where they fix all the big trucks...opened their doors and wanted us to come visit them. This is so my town, I can't tell you.

The fire department, the police department, the water people, the landscapers - everyone showed up. And then brought their friends, the power company, the recycling groups - and it would appear there is an informal car club amongst the city workers, so they all brought their cars to show off as well. And motorcycles. Everybody had swag - I think I have at least six different kinds of 'plant this, it'll grow something AWESOME' to find a spare patch of ground for. Pens. Wee trash trucks. Badges. Stickers. Live ladybugs for your yard.

The landscape people brought the baby goats to show everyone the newest green innovation for keeping brush to a manageable level. BABY GOAT PARTY. So cute.

It was then to Sis' house for birthday BBQ - where kid found his big cousin Alex who is the Best Thing Ever (this is my niece's boy, nearly 17, plays sports Big Time and moonlights as a coach to preschool soccer players), pool antics, cousin Pookie (who also thinks he's Great Fun), 14 going on 52 and starting high school in the fall and a huge adult to kid ratio in his favor. It was a good warm up to what we can expect on our trip - and he's doing much better these days with it. The Best Day Ever is not followed up by the Worst Day Ever, so we aren't seeing that anxiety going into really fun days anymore (thank God).

Sis also had tasty, tasty champagne and that was also good.

Sunday was church (which was interesting all on its own, our group is instituting gender non-specific language in a big way in all our materials, and this was the first Sunday of it), but then it also included [livejournal.com profile] catsonmars for the kid's haircut, lunch and nap - which was a nice change. This is something I want more of, and very glad I was to get it. It's just the schedules don't always mesh as well as they did yesterday - glad to get that time? Oh man.

Then Jim came home after getting the all-clear - Friday, we got word of another kidney stone, but how bad, no clue - he got his CT done at work, and read while he waited (hey, take x-rays for a living, get some useful perks). The all-clear is qualified by other things found on the CT which are going to need attention - but at least, we can travel knowing we won't be landing in an ER dealing with worse while we're gone.

I did mention a list. Right.

And this is Monday, right. Got to go - the lists are running ahead of me, and I have to catch up.
kyburg: (Default)
I've got three days before I get on a plane. And then I'm away from home for over a week.

Tonight, I pack the box of ship-aheads - and pull out the beast from storage and begin putting it all together to be self-contained and out of suitcases. Oh, and pack an extra empty one because I know what I find when I go back there. There's a candle outlet store that is the BEST I've ever been inside, and the antique shopping doesn't get much better. Seriously, I've brought home Nippon porcelain every time, and that stuff is HARD to find anywhere else. Back there, it's just Gran's pretty teapot or somesuch. To me, it's something old, but very specific to a time and place - and just look at those landscapes. Um, nerd. Am I a collector? No, I'm a hoarder. 'Nuff said.

In other news, the WTF list continues to grow (no, you don't know all of it) and I've had to pull out the short list of who to call who won't be damaged when I start talking about some of it. It's not just who can handle the load - it's who can find the fracking humor in the whack of the last three weeks. Because first you get the list, and then you get me shaking my head and bibbling while I try to get my head around it.

Kid had an AWESOME weekend. Saturday was Torrance's City Maintenance Yard Open House. Yes, the place with all the landscaping equipment and where they fix all the big trucks...opened their doors and wanted us to come visit them. This is so my town, I can't tell you.

The fire department, the police department, the water people, the landscapers - everyone showed up. And then brought their friends, the power company, the recycling groups - and it would appear there is an informal car club amongst the city workers, so they all brought their cars to show off as well. And motorcycles. Everybody had swag - I think I have at least six different kinds of 'plant this, it'll grow something AWESOME' to find a spare patch of ground for. Pens. Wee trash trucks. Badges. Stickers. Live ladybugs for your yard.

The landscape people brought the baby goats to show everyone the newest green innovation for keeping brush to a manageable level. BABY GOAT PARTY. So cute.

It was then to Sis' house for birthday BBQ - where kid found his big cousin Alex who is the Best Thing Ever (this is my niece's boy, nearly 17, plays sports Big Time and moonlights as a coach to preschool soccer players), pool antics, cousin Pookie (who also thinks he's Great Fun), 14 going on 52 and starting high school in the fall and a huge adult to kid ratio in his favor. It was a good warm up to what we can expect on our trip - and he's doing much better these days with it. The Best Day Ever is not followed up by the Worst Day Ever, so we aren't seeing that anxiety going into really fun days anymore (thank God).

Sis also had tasty, tasty champagne and that was also good.

Sunday was church (which was interesting all on its own, our group is instituting gender non-specific language in a big way in all our materials, and this was the first Sunday of it), but then it also included [livejournal.com profile] catsonmars for the kid's haircut, lunch and nap - which was a nice change. This is something I want more of, and very glad I was to get it. It's just the schedules don't always mesh as well as they did yesterday - glad to get that time? Oh man.

Then Jim came home after getting the all-clear - Friday, we got word of another kidney stone, but how bad, no clue - he got his CT done at work, and read while he waited (hey, take x-rays for a living, get some useful perks). The all-clear is qualified by other things found on the CT which are going to need attention - but at least, we can travel knowing we won't be landing in an ER dealing with worse while we're gone.

I did mention a list. Right.

And this is Monday, right. Got to go - the lists are running ahead of me, and I have to catch up.
kyburg: (Default)
I've got three days before I get on a plane. And then I'm away from home for over a week.

Tonight, I pack the box of ship-aheads - and pull out the beast from storage and begin putting it all together to be self-contained and out of suitcases. Oh, and pack an extra empty one because I know what I find when I go back there. There's a candle outlet store that is the BEST I've ever been inside, and the antique shopping doesn't get much better. Seriously, I've brought home Nippon porcelain every time, and that stuff is HARD to find anywhere else. Back there, it's just Gran's pretty teapot or somesuch. To me, it's something old, but very specific to a time and place - and just look at those landscapes. Um, nerd. Am I a collector? No, I'm a hoarder. 'Nuff said.

In other news, the WTF list continues to grow (no, you don't know all of it) and I've had to pull out the short list of who to call who won't be damaged when I start talking about some of it. It's not just who can handle the load - it's who can find the fracking humor in the whack of the last three weeks. Because first you get the list, and then you get me shaking my head and bibbling while I try to get my head around it.

Kid had an AWESOME weekend. Saturday was Torrance's City Maintenance Yard Open House. Yes, the place with all the landscaping equipment and where they fix all the big trucks...opened their doors and wanted us to come visit them. This is so my town, I can't tell you.

The fire department, the police department, the water people, the landscapers - everyone showed up. And then brought their friends, the power company, the recycling groups - and it would appear there is an informal car club amongst the city workers, so they all brought their cars to show off as well. And motorcycles. Everybody had swag - I think I have at least six different kinds of 'plant this, it'll grow something AWESOME' to find a spare patch of ground for. Pens. Wee trash trucks. Badges. Stickers. Live ladybugs for your yard.

The landscape people brought the baby goats to show everyone the newest green innovation for keeping brush to a manageable level. BABY GOAT PARTY. So cute.

It was then to Sis' house for birthday BBQ - where kid found his big cousin Alex who is the Best Thing Ever (this is my niece's boy, nearly 17, plays sports Big Time and moonlights as a coach to preschool soccer players), pool antics, cousin Pookie (who also thinks he's Great Fun), 14 going on 52 and starting high school in the fall and a huge adult to kid ratio in his favor. It was a good warm up to what we can expect on our trip - and he's doing much better these days with it. The Best Day Ever is not followed up by the Worst Day Ever, so we aren't seeing that anxiety going into really fun days anymore (thank God).

Sis also had tasty, tasty champagne and that was also good.

Sunday was church (which was interesting all on its own, our group is instituting gender non-specific language in a big way in all our materials, and this was the first Sunday of it), but then it also included [livejournal.com profile] catsonmars for the kid's haircut, lunch and nap - which was a nice change. This is something I want more of, and very glad I was to get it. It's just the schedules don't always mesh as well as they did yesterday - glad to get that time? Oh man.

Then Jim came home after getting the all-clear - Friday, we got word of another kidney stone, but how bad, no clue - he got his CT done at work, and read while he waited (hey, take x-rays for a living, get some useful perks). The all-clear is qualified by other things found on the CT which are going to need attention - but at least, we can travel knowing we won't be landing in an ER dealing with worse while we're gone.

I did mention a list. Right.

And this is Monday, right. Got to go - the lists are running ahead of me, and I have to catch up.
kyburg: (blog this)
I am up, vertical and functional this morning - kid is at preschool, Jim is at work and we're not falling over exhausted.

But we just finished doing a con in San Francisco that required a little over six hours of driving each way to attend. (Three hundred dollars is three hundred dollars, and I packed pocketknives, toothpaste, shampoo and didn't have to show my ID neither. Pthwwpt!)

Taking advantage of the company's rental junket club, I rented a hybrid to do the drive. Getting to the lot, we were shown all of the choices available - which included a Ford Escape.

It was bigger than the Prius. We were doing a con. We scratched our heads and said 'why not?'

Oh baby. I can see why Ford is still in business. Let's just say - it worked. Worked WELL. It was one thing we didn't have to worry about.

Something you don't expect to find in a car, but the hybrids probably take for granted - electric ports of all kinds. Like - a 110 plug. Baby, I plugged in a power strip and the kid and I both had tech all the way up and back. I played Sims on my laptop, and he watched all the DVDs we could play. Effortless.

One reason we're not exhausted.

Animation On Display (AOD) moved its digs from the old Cathedral Hill Hotel to the Kabuki Hotel in J-Town, due to imminent demise of the Cat Hill - it's going to see a wrecking ball Real Soon Now and I still think someone ought to dart in there and steal random objects. We really loved that old place - but.

Let's get one thing straight. The Kabuki is POSH. After spending many happy, happy years at the Cat Hill, with its bare (but dressed) cement walls, institutional-style flush toliets, leaky ceilings, elevators that refused to work with more than eight people in them (but had the cheery 'Help Is On The Way' buttons in them) and beds that resembled blocks of stone - stepping into the Kabuki must have seemed like a sweet, sweet reward.

(For instance - Con Ops had been held on the third floor of the Cat Hill in a little room with no windows and little change in color from floor to ceiling - not even pictures on the walls. We checked into our room, decided the Con Chair loved me because our room? OH BABY. And then word reached us in reverent tones. "Con Ops - has a sauna!")

No shit.

Our room? Soft, welcoming beds with feather duvets so thick the kid almost disappeared into them at naptime. On the 9th floor, well out of range of any loud attendees or other possible noise issues. At the end of the hall. The short end. The bathroom had a furo tub in it that must have been 3 - 4' deep - Jim and the kid took a bath together in it, that big. (It took a while to fill up. Oh well. There was a place to shower off first anyway.) And the hotel tolietries were wonderful and plentiful.

The mini-bar was expensive, but had Pocky.

Reason number two we're not exhausted.

First day of the con, Jim is drafted to a Costco run - so he takes kid, hybrid and con staffer and is gone most of the morning. Me, I get to help out at Registration - and quickly find out I can bellow 'NEEEEXT' to pitch. Two hours into the con, and the lines are CLEARED.

But now it's time for me to take kid, feed him lunch and put down for nap for I have a panel at two. Cupcakes are arriving at 1:30, and I've got [livejournal.com profile] joseph_palmer coming in to help me out with the panel.

One, two, three, four. We eat, the kid goes down to sleep, cupcakes arrive, so does Joe - and the panel goes off beautifully.

Celebrations are had after, and much sake is consumed by both me and [livejournal.com profile] silverkun - who steps in to be me/Jim at need when kid stuff takes over the schedule. This works amazingly well. The fact I have three of Xander's 'committee' on site during this con makes me a very happy panda - the fact that they are all getting to know each other better makes me ecstatic. The fact that I'm having to do NOTHING for this to happen organically is beyond words.

Reason three I'm not exhausted.

I spend very little time in Ops, when last year I lived there. I found I was doing one of four things - sleeping (which having kid onboard made mandatory), eating something with him prior to putting to bed (either a nap or sleep), doing a panel or something related to con, but not in Ops. And Ops had a sauna! *pouts* Well, not very much. I got two of the best hot soaks in years, and I didn't even have to leave my room!

Sunday comes off like clockwork, as I take kid shopping in the morning (scoring FIVE Pokemon bath fizzies, hooray!), feeding him lunch and getting him back to the room for his nap before I grab laptop, DVDs and my ass as I find myself doing a 'the 60's were a great time to be a kid' panel. I'm certain I'm going to be facing an empty room twenty minutes into the panel and fold. I am surprised to find a similar result to the fan fic panel - people came in to the room and stayed to the end. I played a bunch of DVD clips, nattered and gromished my way through an hour and decided this is actually a pretty good idea, but needs better prep. (I thought they'd cancelled it when I asked for a schedule change for the fan fic panel. Uh, no. They flipped them.)

I come to my senses after the panel - we really should pack up and start driving to get home anytime at a reasonable hour for all of us. So we say our goodbyes, hit the road and get home before 9:30 PM.

I really wanted another hour for shopping. That's my only regret. I can get the california roll bento anytime.

AOD 2010 - assignment complete. And I can't wait for next year.
kyburg: (blog this)
I am up, vertical and functional this morning - kid is at preschool, Jim is at work and we're not falling over exhausted.

But we just finished doing a con in San Francisco that required a little over six hours of driving each way to attend. (Three hundred dollars is three hundred dollars, and I packed pocketknives, toothpaste, shampoo and didn't have to show my ID neither. Pthwwpt!)

Taking advantage of the company's rental junket club, I rented a hybrid to do the drive. Getting to the lot, we were shown all of the choices available - which included a Ford Escape.

It was bigger than the Prius. We were doing a con. We scratched our heads and said 'why not?'

Oh baby. I can see why Ford is still in business. Let's just say - it worked. Worked WELL. It was one thing we didn't have to worry about.

Something you don't expect to find in a car, but the hybrids probably take for granted - electric ports of all kinds. Like - a 110 plug. Baby, I plugged in a power strip and the kid and I both had tech all the way up and back. I played Sims on my laptop, and he watched all the DVDs we could play. Effortless.

One reason we're not exhausted.

Animation On Display (AOD) moved its digs from the old Cathedral Hill Hotel to the Kabuki Hotel in J-Town, due to imminent demise of the Cat Hill - it's going to see a wrecking ball Real Soon Now and I still think someone ought to dart in there and steal random objects. We really loved that old place - but.

Let's get one thing straight. The Kabuki is POSH. After spending many happy, happy years at the Cat Hill, with its bare (but dressed) cement walls, institutional-style flush toliets, leaky ceilings, elevators that refused to work with more than eight people in them (but had the cheery 'Help Is On The Way' buttons in them) and beds that resembled blocks of stone - stepping into the Kabuki must have seemed like a sweet, sweet reward.

(For instance - Con Ops had been held on the third floor of the Cat Hill in a little room with no windows and little change in color from floor to ceiling - not even pictures on the walls. We checked into our room, decided the Con Chair loved me because our room? OH BABY. And then word reached us in reverent tones. "Con Ops - has a sauna!")

No shit.

Our room? Soft, welcoming beds with feather duvets so thick the kid almost disappeared into them at naptime. On the 9th floor, well out of range of any loud attendees or other possible noise issues. At the end of the hall. The short end. The bathroom had a furo tub in it that must have been 3 - 4' deep - Jim and the kid took a bath together in it, that big. (It took a while to fill up. Oh well. There was a place to shower off first anyway.) And the hotel tolietries were wonderful and plentiful.

The mini-bar was expensive, but had Pocky.

Reason number two we're not exhausted.

First day of the con, Jim is drafted to a Costco run - so he takes kid, hybrid and con staffer and is gone most of the morning. Me, I get to help out at Registration - and quickly find out I can bellow 'NEEEEXT' to pitch. Two hours into the con, and the lines are CLEARED.

But now it's time for me to take kid, feed him lunch and put down for nap for I have a panel at two. Cupcakes are arriving at 1:30, and I've got [livejournal.com profile] joseph_palmer coming in to help me out with the panel.

One, two, three, four. We eat, the kid goes down to sleep, cupcakes arrive, so does Joe - and the panel goes off beautifully.

Celebrations are had after, and much sake is consumed by both me and [livejournal.com profile] silverkun - who steps in to be me/Jim at need when kid stuff takes over the schedule. This works amazingly well. The fact I have three of Xander's 'committee' on site during this con makes me a very happy panda - the fact that they are all getting to know each other better makes me ecstatic. The fact that I'm having to do NOTHING for this to happen organically is beyond words.

Reason three I'm not exhausted.

I spend very little time in Ops, when last year I lived there. I found I was doing one of four things - sleeping (which having kid onboard made mandatory), eating something with him prior to putting to bed (either a nap or sleep), doing a panel or something related to con, but not in Ops. And Ops had a sauna! *pouts* Well, not very much. I got two of the best hot soaks in years, and I didn't even have to leave my room!

Sunday comes off like clockwork, as I take kid shopping in the morning (scoring FIVE Pokemon bath fizzies, hooray!), feeding him lunch and getting him back to the room for his nap before I grab laptop, DVDs and my ass as I find myself doing a 'the 60's were a great time to be a kid' panel. I'm certain I'm going to be facing an empty room twenty minutes into the panel and fold. I am surprised to find a similar result to the fan fic panel - people came in to the room and stayed to the end. I played a bunch of DVD clips, nattered and gromished my way through an hour and decided this is actually a pretty good idea, but needs better prep. (I thought they'd cancelled it when I asked for a schedule change for the fan fic panel. Uh, no. They flipped them.)

I come to my senses after the panel - we really should pack up and start driving to get home anytime at a reasonable hour for all of us. So we say our goodbyes, hit the road and get home before 9:30 PM.

I really wanted another hour for shopping. That's my only regret. I can get the california roll bento anytime.

AOD 2010 - assignment complete. And I can't wait for next year.
kyburg: (blog this)
I am up, vertical and functional this morning - kid is at preschool, Jim is at work and we're not falling over exhausted.

But we just finished doing a con in San Francisco that required a little over six hours of driving each way to attend. (Three hundred dollars is three hundred dollars, and I packed pocketknives, toothpaste, shampoo and didn't have to show my ID neither. Pthwwpt!)

Taking advantage of the company's rental junket club, I rented a hybrid to do the drive. Getting to the lot, we were shown all of the choices available - which included a Ford Escape.

It was bigger than the Prius. We were doing a con. We scratched our heads and said 'why not?'

Oh baby. I can see why Ford is still in business. Let's just say - it worked. Worked WELL. It was one thing we didn't have to worry about.

Something you don't expect to find in a car, but the hybrids probably take for granted - electric ports of all kinds. Like - a 110 plug. Baby, I plugged in a power strip and the kid and I both had tech all the way up and back. I played Sims on my laptop, and he watched all the DVDs we could play. Effortless.

One reason we're not exhausted.

Animation On Display (AOD) moved its digs from the old Cathedral Hill Hotel to the Kabuki Hotel in J-Town, due to imminent demise of the Cat Hill - it's going to see a wrecking ball Real Soon Now and I still think someone ought to dart in there and steal random objects. We really loved that old place - but.

Let's get one thing straight. The Kabuki is POSH. After spending many happy, happy years at the Cat Hill, with its bare (but dressed) cement walls, institutional-style flush toliets, leaky ceilings, elevators that refused to work with more than eight people in them (but had the cheery 'Help Is On The Way' buttons in them) and beds that resembled blocks of stone - stepping into the Kabuki must have seemed like a sweet, sweet reward.

(For instance - Con Ops had been held on the third floor of the Cat Hill in a little room with no windows and little change in color from floor to ceiling - not even pictures on the walls. We checked into our room, decided the Con Chair loved me because our room? OH BABY. And then word reached us in reverent tones. "Con Ops - has a sauna!")

No shit.

Our room? Soft, welcoming beds with feather duvets so thick the kid almost disappeared into them at naptime. On the 9th floor, well out of range of any loud attendees or other possible noise issues. At the end of the hall. The short end. The bathroom had a furo tub in it that must have been 3 - 4' deep - Jim and the kid took a bath together in it, that big. (It took a while to fill up. Oh well. There was a place to shower off first anyway.) And the hotel tolietries were wonderful and plentiful.

The mini-bar was expensive, but had Pocky.

Reason number two we're not exhausted.

First day of the con, Jim is drafted to a Costco run - so he takes kid, hybrid and con staffer and is gone most of the morning. Me, I get to help out at Registration - and quickly find out I can bellow 'NEEEEXT' to pitch. Two hours into the con, and the lines are CLEARED.

But now it's time for me to take kid, feed him lunch and put down for nap for I have a panel at two. Cupcakes are arriving at 1:30, and I've got [livejournal.com profile] joseph_palmer coming in to help me out with the panel.

One, two, three, four. We eat, the kid goes down to sleep, cupcakes arrive, so does Joe - and the panel goes off beautifully.

Celebrations are had after, and much sake is consumed by both me and [livejournal.com profile] silverkun - who steps in to be me/Jim at need when kid stuff takes over the schedule. This works amazingly well. The fact I have three of Xander's 'committee' on site during this con makes me a very happy panda - the fact that they are all getting to know each other better makes me ecstatic. The fact that I'm having to do NOTHING for this to happen organically is beyond words.

Reason three I'm not exhausted.

I spend very little time in Ops, when last year I lived there. I found I was doing one of four things - sleeping (which having kid onboard made mandatory), eating something with him prior to putting to bed (either a nap or sleep), doing a panel or something related to con, but not in Ops. And Ops had a sauna! *pouts* Well, not very much. I got two of the best hot soaks in years, and I didn't even have to leave my room!

Sunday comes off like clockwork, as I take kid shopping in the morning (scoring FIVE Pokemon bath fizzies, hooray!), feeding him lunch and getting him back to the room for his nap before I grab laptop, DVDs and my ass as I find myself doing a 'the 60's were a great time to be a kid' panel. I'm certain I'm going to be facing an empty room twenty minutes into the panel and fold. I am surprised to find a similar result to the fan fic panel - people came in to the room and stayed to the end. I played a bunch of DVD clips, nattered and gromished my way through an hour and decided this is actually a pretty good idea, but needs better prep. (I thought they'd cancelled it when I asked for a schedule change for the fan fic panel. Uh, no. They flipped them.)

I come to my senses after the panel - we really should pack up and start driving to get home anytime at a reasonable hour for all of us. So we say our goodbyes, hit the road and get home before 9:30 PM.

I really wanted another hour for shopping. That's my only regret. I can get the california roll bento anytime.

AOD 2010 - assignment complete. And I can't wait for next year.
kyburg: (Default)
I am relieved beyond relief that it would appear (so far) the issue with [livejournal.com profile] yuki_onna's travel may be resolved - I am staying tuned, however.

I know I've mentioned this - perhaps it was only in passing - but it really does deserve some better documentation.

See, I've been at the mercy of forces out of my control, stuck in a hotel in a place where I didn't speak the language and desperate to get where I had intended to go.

It was in Greece, Athens to be precise - and it was in September, 1990.

Yes, I was in Athens when they decided the Olympics for Atlanta )

That sort of thing kinda stays with you.

Pavlo introduced himself as 'Pavlo - Paul - like the best one of the Beatles!'

So that's why Xander is Alexander-Paul. That's why.

And now you know why it was so important to me that Cat get her trip. Because when you're SO close - it's almost criminal to accept anything less.

If it's only money - hell, we can fix that.
kyburg: (Default)
I am relieved beyond relief that it would appear (so far) the issue with [livejournal.com profile] yuki_onna's travel may be resolved - I am staying tuned, however.

I know I've mentioned this - perhaps it was only in passing - but it really does deserve some better documentation.

See, I've been at the mercy of forces out of my control, stuck in a hotel in a place where I didn't speak the language and desperate to get where I had intended to go.

It was in Greece, Athens to be precise - and it was in September, 1990.

Yes, I was in Athens when they decided the Olympics for Atlanta )

That sort of thing kinda stays with you.

Pavlo introduced himself as 'Pavlo - Paul - like the best one of the Beatles!'

So that's why Xander is Alexander-Paul. That's why.

And now you know why it was so important to me that Cat get her trip. Because when you're SO close - it's almost criminal to accept anything less.

If it's only money - hell, we can fix that.
kyburg: (Default)
I am relieved beyond relief that it would appear (so far) the issue with [livejournal.com profile] yuki_onna's travel may be resolved - I am staying tuned, however.

I know I've mentioned this - perhaps it was only in passing - but it really does deserve some better documentation.

See, I've been at the mercy of forces out of my control, stuck in a hotel in a place where I didn't speak the language and desperate to get where I had intended to go.

It was in Greece, Athens to be precise - and it was in September, 1990.

Yes, I was in Athens when they decided the Olympics for Atlanta )

That sort of thing kinda stays with you.

Pavlo introduced himself as 'Pavlo - Paul - like the best one of the Beatles!'

So that's why Xander is Alexander-Paul. That's why.

And now you know why it was so important to me that Cat get her trip. Because when you're SO close - it's almost criminal to accept anything less.

If it's only money - hell, we can fix that.
kyburg: (Verra temporary)
Last minutes here. Breakfast eaten, dishes done. Toothbrush packed.

Female.

Yeah. Every time something VERY adoption-related has happened? Yeah. Surreal is very much the order of the day.

So I've packed THOSE supplies as well.

Jim is still filling out the last of the AIT forms. Yes, the shuttle will be here inside of two hours. He's on the phone with the agency now.

I'm trying to imagine what this is really going to be like...and nothing comes. I want to know - and I don't. I'm too much of a realist to get fanciful right now.

It's like getting married - only different. I suspect an arranged marriage might seem a lot like this.

The court paperwork answered some of the questions I had, which is good. Any other questions I have about his origins are going to be of a far more immediate nature (is he allergic to anything?) - he'll have coverage when he hits the ground, that's done.

I've even had a chance to talk to the Swiss consulate - and I know what they need, once the readoption is complete.

I'm looking forward to seeing the country. A great, grand adventure - and then the start of another one.

Burn the good stuff, guys. Here we go.
kyburg: (Verra temporary)
Last minutes here. Breakfast eaten, dishes done. Toothbrush packed.

Female.

Yeah. Every time something VERY adoption-related has happened? Yeah. Surreal is very much the order of the day.

So I've packed THOSE supplies as well.

Jim is still filling out the last of the AIT forms. Yes, the shuttle will be here inside of two hours. He's on the phone with the agency now.

I'm trying to imagine what this is really going to be like...and nothing comes. I want to know - and I don't. I'm too much of a realist to get fanciful right now.

It's like getting married - only different. I suspect an arranged marriage might seem a lot like this.

The court paperwork answered some of the questions I had, which is good. Any other questions I have about his origins are going to be of a far more immediate nature (is he allergic to anything?) - he'll have coverage when he hits the ground, that's done.

I've even had a chance to talk to the Swiss consulate - and I know what they need, once the readoption is complete.

I'm looking forward to seeing the country. A great, grand adventure - and then the start of another one.

Burn the good stuff, guys. Here we go.
kyburg: (Verra temporary)
Last minutes here. Breakfast eaten, dishes done. Toothbrush packed.

Female.

Yeah. Every time something VERY adoption-related has happened? Yeah. Surreal is very much the order of the day.

So I've packed THOSE supplies as well.

Jim is still filling out the last of the AIT forms. Yes, the shuttle will be here inside of two hours. He's on the phone with the agency now.

I'm trying to imagine what this is really going to be like...and nothing comes. I want to know - and I don't. I'm too much of a realist to get fanciful right now.

It's like getting married - only different. I suspect an arranged marriage might seem a lot like this.

The court paperwork answered some of the questions I had, which is good. Any other questions I have about his origins are going to be of a far more immediate nature (is he allergic to anything?) - he'll have coverage when he hits the ground, that's done.

I've even had a chance to talk to the Swiss consulate - and I know what they need, once the readoption is complete.

I'm looking forward to seeing the country. A great, grand adventure - and then the start of another one.

Burn the good stuff, guys. Here we go.
kyburg: (chai chai again)
Yeah, the panic is setting in. Kept waking up last night thinking that 1) something was overheating, 2) something fell over and the like.

Reading yet another 'parenting your permanently broken adoptee' book just before bed - maybe not such a good idea.

And Jim is now sick. GOOD TIMES.
kyburg: (chai chai again)
Yeah, the panic is setting in. Kept waking up last night thinking that 1) something was overheating, 2) something fell over and the like.

Reading yet another 'parenting your permanently broken adoptee' book just before bed - maybe not such a good idea.

And Jim is now sick. GOOD TIMES.

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