*whew*

Jan. 24th, 2011 12:40 pm
kyburg: (facepalm)
I-171H permit received. We continue to wait for Sierra. And we will be fingerprinted AGAIN by July of this year.

Why yes, yes we will. Gladly.

Strangest way to have a baby I ever knew. Just saying.

This one has more information than previous ones, though. We are not only good to go to adopt one (1) orphan from China, we are good to go to adopt one female orphan, 8 to 18 months of age, no special needs.

That's what we're being told to expect.

There are more forms to apply for, of course. Will be following up with the agency and all that.

But we almost took ourselves out. Guess what won't be happening again.

*whew*

Jan. 24th, 2011 12:40 pm
kyburg: (facepalm)
I-171H permit received. We continue to wait for Sierra. And we will be fingerprinted AGAIN by July of this year.

Why yes, yes we will. Gladly.

Strangest way to have a baby I ever knew. Just saying.

This one has more information than previous ones, though. We are not only good to go to adopt one (1) orphan from China, we are good to go to adopt one female orphan, 8 to 18 months of age, no special needs.

That's what we're being told to expect.

There are more forms to apply for, of course. Will be following up with the agency and all that.

But we almost took ourselves out. Guess what won't be happening again.

*whew*

Jan. 24th, 2011 12:40 pm
kyburg: (facepalm)
I-171H permit received. We continue to wait for Sierra. And we will be fingerprinted AGAIN by July of this year.

Why yes, yes we will. Gladly.

Strangest way to have a baby I ever knew. Just saying.

This one has more information than previous ones, though. We are not only good to go to adopt one (1) orphan from China, we are good to go to adopt one female orphan, 8 to 18 months of age, no special needs.

That's what we're being told to expect.

There are more forms to apply for, of course. Will be following up with the agency and all that.

But we almost took ourselves out. Guess what won't be happening again.
kyburg: (bad mommy)
There's a little widget on my profile that reads something to the order of 'waiting almost four years for Sierra-Rose' on it. You know that one? The clock starts with the LID date of her dossier we sent to China.

The one that is headed for the trashcan as we speak.

Why, you ask? Why because we can't seem to get our paperwork done on time. Because when I hand Jim a piece of paper from the Customs and Immigration people, it gets ignored. Because I'm tired too and want to stop working at night.

Because. I literally don't have any more clock cycles and it got dropped.

We got a panic call from our agency Wednesday after a kind officer called them asking why we hadn't gotten back to them with our paperwork...and that our case had actually been closed in October, but they were advocating to keep it open.

You can imagine. I haven't touched ground long enough to do anything but fume since.

I was able to get the financials done, my employment verifications and the tax records copied and to the agency next day. Jim? He's working on getting his done today - and it's iffy. If he can't make it happen?

We're done. Toss the four years (and the year and a half prior to that) in the trash and Xander remains an only child. See, I'm fifty now. I am now too old to have kids - unless I slipped my application under the door five years ago. Maybe we can redo the CIS permit under Hague regulations (I would certainly hope so), but then that raises questions on both sides I don't want to think about.

Keep in mind we started work on adopting our family in 2003. Sure, it's a walk in the park and there are TONS of kids who need families!

Until you actually, you know - TRY to find them. Or they, you. Without someone engaging in human trafficking, of course. Which in a lot of cases? You may have been party to, without your knowledge. (Hello, Guatemala?)

I'm told domestic adoptions are getting easier - well, hey - bad economy! (Ugh. Families need to stay together guys. I'm not engaging in any baby scooping. Do. Not. WANT.) And again, I'm now scary old.

Angry would be refreshing. I am getting my head around being done and raising an only child.

I'll let you know if that changes. We'll be damn lucky if it does.
kyburg: (bad mommy)
There's a little widget on my profile that reads something to the order of 'waiting almost four years for Sierra-Rose' on it. You know that one? The clock starts with the LID date of her dossier we sent to China.

The one that is headed for the trashcan as we speak.

Why, you ask? Why because we can't seem to get our paperwork done on time. Because when I hand Jim a piece of paper from the Customs and Immigration people, it gets ignored. Because I'm tired too and want to stop working at night.

Because. I literally don't have any more clock cycles and it got dropped.

We got a panic call from our agency Wednesday after a kind officer called them asking why we hadn't gotten back to them with our paperwork...and that our case had actually been closed in October, but they were advocating to keep it open.

You can imagine. I haven't touched ground long enough to do anything but fume since.

I was able to get the financials done, my employment verifications and the tax records copied and to the agency next day. Jim? He's working on getting his done today - and it's iffy. If he can't make it happen?

We're done. Toss the four years (and the year and a half prior to that) in the trash and Xander remains an only child. See, I'm fifty now. I am now too old to have kids - unless I slipped my application under the door five years ago. Maybe we can redo the CIS permit under Hague regulations (I would certainly hope so), but then that raises questions on both sides I don't want to think about.

Keep in mind we started work on adopting our family in 2003. Sure, it's a walk in the park and there are TONS of kids who need families!

Until you actually, you know - TRY to find them. Or they, you. Without someone engaging in human trafficking, of course. Which in a lot of cases? You may have been party to, without your knowledge. (Hello, Guatemala?)

I'm told domestic adoptions are getting easier - well, hey - bad economy! (Ugh. Families need to stay together guys. I'm not engaging in any baby scooping. Do. Not. WANT.) And again, I'm now scary old.

Angry would be refreshing. I am getting my head around being done and raising an only child.

I'll let you know if that changes. We'll be damn lucky if it does.
kyburg: (bad mommy)
There's a little widget on my profile that reads something to the order of 'waiting almost four years for Sierra-Rose' on it. You know that one? The clock starts with the LID date of her dossier we sent to China.

The one that is headed for the trashcan as we speak.

Why, you ask? Why because we can't seem to get our paperwork done on time. Because when I hand Jim a piece of paper from the Customs and Immigration people, it gets ignored. Because I'm tired too and want to stop working at night.

Because. I literally don't have any more clock cycles and it got dropped.

We got a panic call from our agency Wednesday after a kind officer called them asking why we hadn't gotten back to them with our paperwork...and that our case had actually been closed in October, but they were advocating to keep it open.

You can imagine. I haven't touched ground long enough to do anything but fume since.

I was able to get the financials done, my employment verifications and the tax records copied and to the agency next day. Jim? He's working on getting his done today - and it's iffy. If he can't make it happen?

We're done. Toss the four years (and the year and a half prior to that) in the trash and Xander remains an only child. See, I'm fifty now. I am now too old to have kids - unless I slipped my application under the door five years ago. Maybe we can redo the CIS permit under Hague regulations (I would certainly hope so), but then that raises questions on both sides I don't want to think about.

Keep in mind we started work on adopting our family in 2003. Sure, it's a walk in the park and there are TONS of kids who need families!

Until you actually, you know - TRY to find them. Or they, you. Without someone engaging in human trafficking, of course. Which in a lot of cases? You may have been party to, without your knowledge. (Hello, Guatemala?)

I'm told domestic adoptions are getting easier - well, hey - bad economy! (Ugh. Families need to stay together guys. I'm not engaging in any baby scooping. Do. Not. WANT.) And again, I'm now scary old.

Angry would be refreshing. I am getting my head around being done and raising an only child.

I'll let you know if that changes. We'll be damn lucky if it does.
kyburg: (dragon fist)
This is getting to be a pattern. But, since I've long past reached the point where I know what will happen when you mix baking soda and vinegar together, such things can be taken as a pleasant change of pace. A surprise, take it or leave it.

I finally got to chat up my fellow APs at church yesterday - the ones who adopted from Russia 12 years ago? Well, I got something I hadn't expected - sympathy for the woman who had put her child on a plane back to Russia alone. As in - wish I had been that smart!

Suffice it to say, my ire at what had been done to the child hadn't reached a sympathetic audience. Let's be blunt - I haven't had a chance to talk to another AP, outside of Jim, about this. She had. She'd had a whole school of parents of children like hers - an adaptive school, the short-bus variety, pick your label - to talk to about it.

Um.

Okay, I just got slapped in the face with my own privilege again - to a point. One, my kid does not have RAD, PDD or any noticeable delays to report. Matter of fact, he's ahead of the curve, adapting well and you'd be hard-pressed to pick him out of the crowd of his peers as 'that kid' these days. When we show up - that changes. Just a bit. He doesn't change from being incredibly bright, engaged, healthy and energetic. He prefers his father over me, but they do more things together, and if you want comfort - that's your guy - so none of that is concerning.

My child is not FAS, FAE. Not even a little bit. I can't tell you how devastating that is - and there is nothing to do about it once it happens. Your child is exposed in utereo to alchol and takes damage...it's worse than anything you ever imagined. And it's incremental. A kid who looks pretty much okay will have it, and it won't show up until they hit school age and then it's a clusterfuck. Particularly in an international adoption. There are guys who specialize in making educated guesses based on the photographs you get with your referral - and they're DEAD serious. Consult these guys before you sign - mean it.

Because if you aren't ready for it?

Wish I had been that smart.

They've done wonderful things with their kid - I was able to put an arm around his shoulders and give him a big hug of greeting after church which was returned with a smile and some surprise. A RAD kid? You'd have gotten too much or too little response, or something inappropriate in return - I keep telling his folks what a great kid he is and how good a job they've done with him. They have. He and my kid adore each other, it shows whenever they interact with each other. (Church provides a lot more than faith, and has more reasons for being on my schedule that good behavior. It provides a social outlet and resources - good ones. Case in point.)

God, I need to talk to them some more about this.

IMHO, I've ducked that bullet. Next kid will have the institutional-created delays in addition to any nutritionally created ones, let alone the attachment potentials you face in any adoption, based on age at placement, and the kid herself. You gotta be ready for that. If I learned nothing else in those years of parenting classes - it was this: you're here because you need to be ready for awful, terrible outcomes. You still want to do this?

I lined up titled, experienced professionals. I have books to refer back to. I loaded my long-term memory with a lot of reading. I take nothing on first or second glance, and expect things a lot of folks would rather I didn't. If bad things don't show up? WIN. But if they do? I may grieve. But I have a path to take to cope. And then - make it better.

People who only saw healthy white infants in need of adoption? I'd looked at my share of waiting children lists for Russia. Romania. And decided it was not for me. I'm not a child development degreed - mine is in popular culture, to be blunt - it shares more with a English/Public Relations function than Social Work or Education.

My agency did not do placements from Russia or Romania - or the Phillipines, India or Cambodia. They had identified needs in China and Taiwan - so that's where we went. Well established programs with some well identified (and experienced) pitfalls. Over and over. Be ready. Sure you want to do this? Be ready.

So - I'm not exactly shocked. Rocked back on my heels a bit - it's the first person I've run into who had anything but rage directed at the lady in TN who abrupted/disrupted her adoption in the most creepy, heartless, exacting way on the record so far. I *still* want to get my hands on that kid myself to see exactly what the issue was and see what I could do (no, seriously - I've been renting space in my head over this) but I'll never get a shot at it because she did what she (and her mother) did.

Happy Mothers Day.

For the record? Mother's Day stuff for me was done on Saturday - Sunday was a complete non-starter in the celebrating category. Church, lunch at McDonald's (er, yum), naps and then keeping kid occupied and out of the house while Jim came home sick and put himself to bed. It involved kid and I doing some shopping and picking up of things, but nothing more involved that that. Sis and my Mom? Well, I sent flowers to the mothers - and that was the extent of their involvement in my Mother's Day. Mom called me, we talked - but neither of us had heard from Sis.

I really wanted that mimosa, yanno. Oh well. Guess I get to make them myself at home.

I didn't get to go light the candles we did last year. But we also didn't have the misery that was dim sum last year this year either. (Poor kid wouldn't eat anything. And I was a wreck.)

This year - much improved over last year. And the outlook remains bright and unclouded. When I say my kid is adapting well, that does not mean he doesn't have processing going on (I've been hearing a lot of Taiwan-related comps lately) and knows everything is changed from what he started with. He grieves and things can trigger some real tears. That's how we know we've got a kid that is adapting - we can see the struggle. It's normal. If it didn't show up this way, it would show up in others - and they would be harder to cope with.

And like anything else with kids - once you get it all down, they outgrow it and pick up a whole new set for you to get used to.

Thanks for all your good wishes - they were greatly appreciated. And now? Now is Monday, now in progress. Did you get your Wheaties this morning?
kyburg: (dragon fist)
This is getting to be a pattern. But, since I've long past reached the point where I know what will happen when you mix baking soda and vinegar together, such things can be taken as a pleasant change of pace. A surprise, take it or leave it.

I finally got to chat up my fellow APs at church yesterday - the ones who adopted from Russia 12 years ago? Well, I got something I hadn't expected - sympathy for the woman who had put her child on a plane back to Russia alone. As in - wish I had been that smart!

Suffice it to say, my ire at what had been done to the child hadn't reached a sympathetic audience. Let's be blunt - I haven't had a chance to talk to another AP, outside of Jim, about this. She had. She'd had a whole school of parents of children like hers - an adaptive school, the short-bus variety, pick your label - to talk to about it.

Um.

Okay, I just got slapped in the face with my own privilege again - to a point. One, my kid does not have RAD, PDD or any noticeable delays to report. Matter of fact, he's ahead of the curve, adapting well and you'd be hard-pressed to pick him out of the crowd of his peers as 'that kid' these days. When we show up - that changes. Just a bit. He doesn't change from being incredibly bright, engaged, healthy and energetic. He prefers his father over me, but they do more things together, and if you want comfort - that's your guy - so none of that is concerning.

My child is not FAS, FAE. Not even a little bit. I can't tell you how devastating that is - and there is nothing to do about it once it happens. Your child is exposed in utereo to alchol and takes damage...it's worse than anything you ever imagined. And it's incremental. A kid who looks pretty much okay will have it, and it won't show up until they hit school age and then it's a clusterfuck. Particularly in an international adoption. There are guys who specialize in making educated guesses based on the photographs you get with your referral - and they're DEAD serious. Consult these guys before you sign - mean it.

Because if you aren't ready for it?

Wish I had been that smart.

They've done wonderful things with their kid - I was able to put an arm around his shoulders and give him a big hug of greeting after church which was returned with a smile and some surprise. A RAD kid? You'd have gotten too much or too little response, or something inappropriate in return - I keep telling his folks what a great kid he is and how good a job they've done with him. They have. He and my kid adore each other, it shows whenever they interact with each other. (Church provides a lot more than faith, and has more reasons for being on my schedule that good behavior. It provides a social outlet and resources - good ones. Case in point.)

God, I need to talk to them some more about this.

IMHO, I've ducked that bullet. Next kid will have the institutional-created delays in addition to any nutritionally created ones, let alone the attachment potentials you face in any adoption, based on age at placement, and the kid herself. You gotta be ready for that. If I learned nothing else in those years of parenting classes - it was this: you're here because you need to be ready for awful, terrible outcomes. You still want to do this?

I lined up titled, experienced professionals. I have books to refer back to. I loaded my long-term memory with a lot of reading. I take nothing on first or second glance, and expect things a lot of folks would rather I didn't. If bad things don't show up? WIN. But if they do? I may grieve. But I have a path to take to cope. And then - make it better.

People who only saw healthy white infants in need of adoption? I'd looked at my share of waiting children lists for Russia. Romania. And decided it was not for me. I'm not a child development degreed - mine is in popular culture, to be blunt - it shares more with a English/Public Relations function than Social Work or Education.

My agency did not do placements from Russia or Romania - or the Phillipines, India or Cambodia. They had identified needs in China and Taiwan - so that's where we went. Well established programs with some well identified (and experienced) pitfalls. Over and over. Be ready. Sure you want to do this? Be ready.

So - I'm not exactly shocked. Rocked back on my heels a bit - it's the first person I've run into who had anything but rage directed at the lady in TN who abrupted/disrupted her adoption in the most creepy, heartless, exacting way on the record so far. I *still* want to get my hands on that kid myself to see exactly what the issue was and see what I could do (no, seriously - I've been renting space in my head over this) but I'll never get a shot at it because she did what she (and her mother) did.

Happy Mothers Day.

For the record? Mother's Day stuff for me was done on Saturday - Sunday was a complete non-starter in the celebrating category. Church, lunch at McDonald's (er, yum), naps and then keeping kid occupied and out of the house while Jim came home sick and put himself to bed. It involved kid and I doing some shopping and picking up of things, but nothing more involved that that. Sis and my Mom? Well, I sent flowers to the mothers - and that was the extent of their involvement in my Mother's Day. Mom called me, we talked - but neither of us had heard from Sis.

I really wanted that mimosa, yanno. Oh well. Guess I get to make them myself at home.

I didn't get to go light the candles we did last year. But we also didn't have the misery that was dim sum last year this year either. (Poor kid wouldn't eat anything. And I was a wreck.)

This year - much improved over last year. And the outlook remains bright and unclouded. When I say my kid is adapting well, that does not mean he doesn't have processing going on (I've been hearing a lot of Taiwan-related comps lately) and knows everything is changed from what he started with. He grieves and things can trigger some real tears. That's how we know we've got a kid that is adapting - we can see the struggle. It's normal. If it didn't show up this way, it would show up in others - and they would be harder to cope with.

And like anything else with kids - once you get it all down, they outgrow it and pick up a whole new set for you to get used to.

Thanks for all your good wishes - they were greatly appreciated. And now? Now is Monday, now in progress. Did you get your Wheaties this morning?
kyburg: (dragon fist)
This is getting to be a pattern. But, since I've long past reached the point where I know what will happen when you mix baking soda and vinegar together, such things can be taken as a pleasant change of pace. A surprise, take it or leave it.

I finally got to chat up my fellow APs at church yesterday - the ones who adopted from Russia 12 years ago? Well, I got something I hadn't expected - sympathy for the woman who had put her child on a plane back to Russia alone. As in - wish I had been that smart!

Suffice it to say, my ire at what had been done to the child hadn't reached a sympathetic audience. Let's be blunt - I haven't had a chance to talk to another AP, outside of Jim, about this. She had. She'd had a whole school of parents of children like hers - an adaptive school, the short-bus variety, pick your label - to talk to about it.

Um.

Okay, I just got slapped in the face with my own privilege again - to a point. One, my kid does not have RAD, PDD or any noticeable delays to report. Matter of fact, he's ahead of the curve, adapting well and you'd be hard-pressed to pick him out of the crowd of his peers as 'that kid' these days. When we show up - that changes. Just a bit. He doesn't change from being incredibly bright, engaged, healthy and energetic. He prefers his father over me, but they do more things together, and if you want comfort - that's your guy - so none of that is concerning.

My child is not FAS, FAE. Not even a little bit. I can't tell you how devastating that is - and there is nothing to do about it once it happens. Your child is exposed in utereo to alchol and takes damage...it's worse than anything you ever imagined. And it's incremental. A kid who looks pretty much okay will have it, and it won't show up until they hit school age and then it's a clusterfuck. Particularly in an international adoption. There are guys who specialize in making educated guesses based on the photographs you get with your referral - and they're DEAD serious. Consult these guys before you sign - mean it.

Because if you aren't ready for it?

Wish I had been that smart.

They've done wonderful things with their kid - I was able to put an arm around his shoulders and give him a big hug of greeting after church which was returned with a smile and some surprise. A RAD kid? You'd have gotten too much or too little response, or something inappropriate in return - I keep telling his folks what a great kid he is and how good a job they've done with him. They have. He and my kid adore each other, it shows whenever they interact with each other. (Church provides a lot more than faith, and has more reasons for being on my schedule that good behavior. It provides a social outlet and resources - good ones. Case in point.)

God, I need to talk to them some more about this.

IMHO, I've ducked that bullet. Next kid will have the institutional-created delays in addition to any nutritionally created ones, let alone the attachment potentials you face in any adoption, based on age at placement, and the kid herself. You gotta be ready for that. If I learned nothing else in those years of parenting classes - it was this: you're here because you need to be ready for awful, terrible outcomes. You still want to do this?

I lined up titled, experienced professionals. I have books to refer back to. I loaded my long-term memory with a lot of reading. I take nothing on first or second glance, and expect things a lot of folks would rather I didn't. If bad things don't show up? WIN. But if they do? I may grieve. But I have a path to take to cope. And then - make it better.

People who only saw healthy white infants in need of adoption? I'd looked at my share of waiting children lists for Russia. Romania. And decided it was not for me. I'm not a child development degreed - mine is in popular culture, to be blunt - it shares more with a English/Public Relations function than Social Work or Education.

My agency did not do placements from Russia or Romania - or the Phillipines, India or Cambodia. They had identified needs in China and Taiwan - so that's where we went. Well established programs with some well identified (and experienced) pitfalls. Over and over. Be ready. Sure you want to do this? Be ready.

So - I'm not exactly shocked. Rocked back on my heels a bit - it's the first person I've run into who had anything but rage directed at the lady in TN who abrupted/disrupted her adoption in the most creepy, heartless, exacting way on the record so far. I *still* want to get my hands on that kid myself to see exactly what the issue was and see what I could do (no, seriously - I've been renting space in my head over this) but I'll never get a shot at it because she did what she (and her mother) did.

Happy Mothers Day.

For the record? Mother's Day stuff for me was done on Saturday - Sunday was a complete non-starter in the celebrating category. Church, lunch at McDonald's (er, yum), naps and then keeping kid occupied and out of the house while Jim came home sick and put himself to bed. It involved kid and I doing some shopping and picking up of things, but nothing more involved that that. Sis and my Mom? Well, I sent flowers to the mothers - and that was the extent of their involvement in my Mother's Day. Mom called me, we talked - but neither of us had heard from Sis.

I really wanted that mimosa, yanno. Oh well. Guess I get to make them myself at home.

I didn't get to go light the candles we did last year. But we also didn't have the misery that was dim sum last year this year either. (Poor kid wouldn't eat anything. And I was a wreck.)

This year - much improved over last year. And the outlook remains bright and unclouded. When I say my kid is adapting well, that does not mean he doesn't have processing going on (I've been hearing a lot of Taiwan-related comps lately) and knows everything is changed from what he started with. He grieves and things can trigger some real tears. That's how we know we've got a kid that is adapting - we can see the struggle. It's normal. If it didn't show up this way, it would show up in others - and they would be harder to cope with.

And like anything else with kids - once you get it all down, they outgrow it and pick up a whole new set for you to get used to.

Thanks for all your good wishes - they were greatly appreciated. And now? Now is Monday, now in progress. Did you get your Wheaties this morning?

*sighs*

Apr. 14th, 2010 08:39 am
kyburg: (Default)
I really don't like it when the media helps me corroborate a stance I posted about recently.

This is also the world of child abuse. This time - it's just a woman who gave birth to her three kids - two of which are now case files, one of which is a homicide.

19 years old, and had three kids - one of which was 3. I'll also ask you to note the timeline: report made on a prior issue to DCFS by the LAPD March 1st, after they got called prior (how much prior is not reported) Appointment made - but not done? Child drowns April 1st.

They only have time for homicides.

([livejournal.com profile] reannon, is it appropriate not to mention if there were any other adults in the home?)

*sighs*

Apr. 14th, 2010 08:39 am
kyburg: (Default)
I really don't like it when the media helps me corroborate a stance I posted about recently.

This is also the world of child abuse. This time - it's just a woman who gave birth to her three kids - two of which are now case files, one of which is a homicide.

19 years old, and had three kids - one of which was 3. I'll also ask you to note the timeline: report made on a prior issue to DCFS by the LAPD March 1st, after they got called prior (how much prior is not reported) Appointment made - but not done? Child drowns April 1st.

They only have time for homicides.

([livejournal.com profile] reannon, is it appropriate not to mention if there were any other adults in the home?)

*sighs*

Apr. 14th, 2010 08:39 am
kyburg: (Default)
I really don't like it when the media helps me corroborate a stance I posted about recently.

This is also the world of child abuse. This time - it's just a woman who gave birth to her three kids - two of which are now case files, one of which is a homicide.

19 years old, and had three kids - one of which was 3. I'll also ask you to note the timeline: report made on a prior issue to DCFS by the LAPD March 1st, after they got called prior (how much prior is not reported) Appointment made - but not done? Child drowns April 1st.

They only have time for homicides.

([livejournal.com profile] reannon, is it appropriate not to mention if there were any other adults in the home?)
kyburg: (I got nothin')
Meet the man who picked up the little boy from the airport. He's very up-front, to the point - and this makes me all the madder.

Who would do this to a little kid. And the only thing I can think of is how I'd want a crack at helping him...and because of the circumstances surrounding the need for that help? I'll never even get a chance to ask.

I got nothing. Just - go get an education. I'll be here when you get back.
kyburg: (I got nothin')
Meet the man who picked up the little boy from the airport. He's very up-front, to the point - and this makes me all the madder.

Who would do this to a little kid. And the only thing I can think of is how I'd want a crack at helping him...and because of the circumstances surrounding the need for that help? I'll never even get a chance to ask.

I got nothing. Just - go get an education. I'll be here when you get back.
kyburg: (I got nothin')
Meet the man who picked up the little boy from the airport. He's very up-front, to the point - and this makes me all the madder.

Who would do this to a little kid. And the only thing I can think of is how I'd want a crack at helping him...and because of the circumstances surrounding the need for that help? I'll never even get a chance to ask.

I got nothing. Just - go get an education. I'll be here when you get back.

Well.

Apr. 12th, 2010 03:39 pm
kyburg: (I got nothin')
My agency *just* opened a Russia program.

Boy, am I looking forward to talking with them when they call back to update my home study.

Well.

Apr. 12th, 2010 03:39 pm
kyburg: (I got nothin')
My agency *just* opened a Russia program.

Boy, am I looking forward to talking with them when they call back to update my home study.

Well.

Apr. 12th, 2010 03:39 pm
kyburg: (I got nothin')
My agency *just* opened a Russia program.

Boy, am I looking forward to talking with them when they call back to update my home study.
kyburg: (Default)
Tell me what you think of this - I think this is made of wonderful:

Abandoned as a newborn, Jane was adopted from Korea by a wealthy white couple at four months. After unexpectedly having two biological children, Jane’s adoptive parents feel they have no use for her, and when she comes out as bisexual at age 13, they kick her out. She is shuffled through the foster care system until aging out, at which point she moves to The Center, a cooperative home for homeless LGBTQ youth. Abandoned so many times, she now calls herself “Jane Doe.”

Jane is a queer femme woman, slim build, 20. Her black hair is cut choppy and asymmetrical, streaked with electric blue. Her style is edgy and futuristic, in black, gray and blue.

Corrupt governmental wheeling and dealing put The Center in the hands of multibillionaire Elliot Rush, whose biotech firm GenFX needs secret human testing. Believing the residents of The Center are “throwaway” people – people no one will miss – Rush uses them as human guinea pigs.

GenFX’s serum takes prexisting traits in the host and amplifies them to a superhuman level, operating under the theory that if a body has a predisposition towards a certain ability, enhancing that trait will give the individual intuitive control over it. Jane has a keen emotional awareness that allows her to read people, situations, feelings and intentions, so when exposed to the serum, her body reacts by amplifying her existing emotional intelligence. She becomes telepathic, and in addition to being able to read others’ minds, she can speak to them in their thoughts and share images or sounds. When experiencing strong emotions, these feelings “radiate,” positively or negatively affecting those around her.


That was the winner of the contest. The one this publication sponsored.

I may just have to get this - even if I have to salt it away...oh wait. Fuck me, it's Black Lava under all of this! I LOVE THESE GUYS. (And have a ton of their stuff.)

Yeah, I gotta go clean out the recycle bin. I want.
kyburg: (Default)
Tell me what you think of this - I think this is made of wonderful:

Abandoned as a newborn, Jane was adopted from Korea by a wealthy white couple at four months. After unexpectedly having two biological children, Jane’s adoptive parents feel they have no use for her, and when she comes out as bisexual at age 13, they kick her out. She is shuffled through the foster care system until aging out, at which point she moves to The Center, a cooperative home for homeless LGBTQ youth. Abandoned so many times, she now calls herself “Jane Doe.”

Jane is a queer femme woman, slim build, 20. Her black hair is cut choppy and asymmetrical, streaked with electric blue. Her style is edgy and futuristic, in black, gray and blue.

Corrupt governmental wheeling and dealing put The Center in the hands of multibillionaire Elliot Rush, whose biotech firm GenFX needs secret human testing. Believing the residents of The Center are “throwaway” people – people no one will miss – Rush uses them as human guinea pigs.

GenFX’s serum takes prexisting traits in the host and amplifies them to a superhuman level, operating under the theory that if a body has a predisposition towards a certain ability, enhancing that trait will give the individual intuitive control over it. Jane has a keen emotional awareness that allows her to read people, situations, feelings and intentions, so when exposed to the serum, her body reacts by amplifying her existing emotional intelligence. She becomes telepathic, and in addition to being able to read others’ minds, she can speak to them in their thoughts and share images or sounds. When experiencing strong emotions, these feelings “radiate,” positively or negatively affecting those around her.


That was the winner of the contest. The one this publication sponsored.

I may just have to get this - even if I have to salt it away...oh wait. Fuck me, it's Black Lava under all of this! I LOVE THESE GUYS. (And have a ton of their stuff.)

Yeah, I gotta go clean out the recycle bin. I want.

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